Figuring out It!

 

When It is figured out, you’re:

The envy of your classmates!

A shining star who aced her final!

At the top of your class!

An honors graduate with every pragmatic it figured out!

Meanwhile that perfectly perfect body of yours? She’s pragmatically and systematically keeping score. 

Sometimes she keeps the score by not so lovingly pushing you down and shoving you back – she’s knowingly underscoring that figuring it out comes down to one thing:

Being.  

Not doing. Not producing. Not attaining the next accolade. Being. 

And that’s the kind of score your perfectly perfect body will happily and healthily always figure out.

 

 

Photo by GreGGme on Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

 

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Take a Hike

This path you’re on? The one where an irritant nestles its way into your shoe causing you to –

Stop.

Sit down.

Remove your shoe.

And shake the debris loose?

Turns out that very debris, that very irritant, that very sit down, all hold great beauty and wonder.

Upon closer examination and honoring of the debris, you’ll discover both the irritant and the pause contain messages and knowledge to inform your own unique path.

Go.

Take a hike.

Beautiful bits of irritating debris are awaiting perfectly perfect you.

Photo by Victor Bezrukov on Foter.com / CC BY-NC

Get a grip

Last night was a history making moment. An end of an era moment. A moment of gratitude and reflection. It was a moment of grace coupled with an incredible knowingness to make space for the next generation of leaders who will undeniably shape a more just world.

It was a moment that almost didn’t happen.

In a packed DC ballroom, of Planned Parenthood staffers and volunteers from across the country, Cecile Richards bid adieu to her Planned Parenthood family. Speaking from her heart, she shared how she nearly didn’t show up to interview for what she calls her opportunity of a lifetime – serving as Planned Parenthood’s national president.

Cecile Richards

Surprisingly Cecile Richards, regarded as one of the fiercest modern-day advocates for women and families, initially doubted her own gifts and talents to lead the national Planned Parenthood organization.

Cecile said, “Like any adult woman who’s unsure of her own abilities, I called my mother.”

Enter Ann Richards, former Governor of Texas, who told her daughter, as only a mother can, “Get a grip, Cecile.”

Each of us, as our own insecure and flawed perfectly perfect self, has the opportunity to create unique, history making moments. It’s as easy – and it’s as difficult – as whole-heartedly showing up in your own life and your own spheres of influence.

It’s our collective moment to get a grip, believe in ourselves, and make a difference.

No time for losers…

 

…we are the champions of the world.

When there’s no time for losers, there’s so much at stake for ourselves and our world.

How do we make advancements holding a binary worldview of losers and champions?

How do we open ourselves to learn from and work with one another inside a politically binary landscape?

To step into our brilliant, perfectly-perfect selves – the place where we can genuinely create and make extraordinary work for ourselves and the world – will each of us have the fortitude to embrace the lessons of sometimes being a loser and sometimes being a winner? 

The world is counting on our perfectly-perfect blended collective of losers and champions to make some impressive, glorious noise.

Go. Now. Get some sand kicked in your face.

 

photo credit: id-iom Maps, DNA and spam via photopin (license)

The “ov” life hack

lifehackAn extraordinary thing happened today.

Actually several extraordinary things happened today.

A friend introduced me to some new people during an inspired life celebration for Mary Louise Mussoline, a woman who lived wholeheartedly, leaving the world and the city of Milwaukee better than she found it.

When asked during the introduction how we knew each other, he responded, “We’re heart friends.”

Not, “oh we worked together on xyz project” or, “we met during the xyz event” rather “we’re heart friends.”

Humbling.

Following Mary Louise’s life celebration, complete with a dance party hosted by Radio Milwaukee, the news of Al Jarreau’s death was breaking.

Synchronicity.

On the day in which Mary Louise’s exceptional life and her ability to utilize music as a vehicle for unity in this racially divided city was being celebrated, the brilliantly talented artist, musician and Milwaukee native Al Jarreau’s life, also using music as change agent, came to an end.

Upon returning home I listened to Al Jarreau’s “We’re in this love together.”

Not “we’re in this life together.” Something much more profound – we’re in this love together – we’re heart friends.

In order to extraordinarily live each day being the change you want for the world, like Milwaukee’s own Mary Louise Mussoline and Al Jarreau, it takes a little life hack – changing up the rhythm of life to the rhythm of love.

Together, as perfectly perfect heart friends, we are indeed in this stressful, politically and socially challenging, gorgeously messy, love together.

As Mary Louise’s dance party was coming to an end, another friend shared this pearl he had learned regarding life and death: “I greet you from the other side. With a love so vast and shattered it will reach you everywhere.”

Go. Do. Be – in this life of love together.

photo credit: monsieurlam Divide : My Favorite Tune via photopin (license)

It is what it is

img_5279

Design by BlackPaint Studios

Until you’re resolved it’s not.

The time is now.

What it is, is not the way forward for women, girls and families.

Backbones. Not wishbones.

Voice your perfectly perfect resolve to be the change you want for the world.

Rise up. Be Visible.

 

13-year-old girls

What words pop into your head?

As a mother, maybe, Caring or Trouble or Sensitive or Shy or Passionate or Kind or Daring or maybe even Yikes!

How about this word?    Activist.

It’s likely the word activist is one Mary Beth Tinker’s mother may have used when describing her daughter.

In 1965 Mary Beth Tinker was 13. She and her friends made history – by being activists.

Armband Advocacy

Armband Advocacy

This young group of friends wore black armbands to school to mourn the Vietnam War dead and support the Christmas peace truce being urged by Robert Kennedy. Mary Beth was suspended as were others. Yet her 13-year old activism resulted in the landmark free speech Supreme Court Case, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent School District.

In a few short weeks, on January 21st, people will gather for Women’s Marches in cities across the country showing their advocacy, their fortitude and their strength – just like Mary Beth Tinker did in 1965.

And just like Mary Beth Tinker, my daughter and I will be wearing our black armbands in the Women’s March on Madison on January 21st.

Thank you Planned Parenthood of Wisconsin for working with women owned BlackPaint Studios to create this powerful reminder of advocacy while allowing us to support the country’s largest provider of reproductive health care.

How will your perfectly perfect 13-year-old heart, advocate for the issues and rights that are important to you?

#Riseup
#Bevisible

Click here to order your Mary Beth Tinker inspired armband.

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